CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Grillo's Pickles

If you haven't been to the Grillo's Pickles website, you should. There, you'll find the fantastic story of how this company began. We've copied part of it here to save you a click.

Grillo's Pickles began with a pickle cart, just a small wooden stand in downtown Boston, where Travis Grillo and his friends would sell two spears for one dollar. Travis would make the pickles by night using his family's 100-year old recipe - one he'd memorized from making pickles every summer as a kid. In the morning, Travis would bike to the Boston Common and set up the cart with his buddies. They'd hang out all day, urging people to try the simple Grillo family pickle. It was a small business but Travis worked hard for it. He made more pickles, biked more miles, and slept less hours than he ever had before.
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CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Factory Five Racing

Factory Five Racing was founded in 1995. Over the years they have grown from a start-up business in a small garage to become the world's largest manufacturer of "build-it-yourself" component car kits. They employ a full-time crew of about 40 people, and are located in Wareham, Massachusetts (about an hour south of Boston). They make their products right here in the USA, in the heart of New England where American manufacturing was born.
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CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Luca + Danni

Fred and Danny Magnanimi grew up watching their father create beautiful, handcrafted jewelry in the family's Cranston, RI jewelry manufacturing business. When the boys grew up, Fred moved to New York and began working on Wall Street as an investment banker, while younger brother Danny, still enamored by the family business, stayed home. Increased competition from overseas businesses created significant challenges for the business, but Danny was confident he could find a way for the family business to evolve and thrive. This was his mission, this was his passion.
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        New Rhode Island Regulations That Affect Businesses

        The Rhode Island governor has issued several new orders that affect Rhode Island businesses. Importantly, all Rhode Island businesses are now subject to regulations promulgated by the Rhode Island department of health pursuant to Executive Order 20-32 . Specially, businesses must:

        (a) Keep a cleaning log documenting the date, time and location of cleaning activities. Businesses should institute daily cleaning for objects touched frequently and more frequent cleaning of objects often touched by the public (grocery carts; POS keypads; etc). The regulations point to CDC guidance as to how often to clean things, so these could change over time.

        (b) “Screen” those entering the building for symptoms. “Screening” can be satisfied by one of three ways: (a) assigning an employee to visually assess (observe) those who enter the building to see if those who enter look to have symptoms of the coronavirus; (b) give those who enter a questionnaire; or (c) require those who enter to “self-screen” (e.g., have a policy requiring individuals on their own run through a checklist and not come in/call if they fail their own self-assessment). An example of such a checklist can be viewed here.

        (c) Have a written plan stored on-site stating what procedures the business has adopted, as well as setting out procedures for responding to a positive case and affirmatively stating the business will cooperate with the department of health. Businesses are encouraged to have legal counsel review such plans to ensure compliance with the new regulations.

        (d) Hang posters published by the RIDOH at each entrance; businesses should hang this poster now.

        There are fines and enforcement mechanisms for not following the new regulations. In addition, the order reopened non-essential retail for pick up and limited browsing (no more than one customer per 300 feet). Also pursuant to the order, the work from home requirements are much less restrictive, now only requiring employers to encourage work from home and telling people they should work from home (versus the prior order’s language requiring the same). Close contact businesses and recreational business are closed until May 23rd, although the DBR can re-open outdoor seating for restaurants prior to that date. The order that prevents COVID-19 unemployment claims from adversely effecting an employer’s experience rating has also been extended to June 5th.

        For additional information and resources visit Partridge Snow & Hahn's COVID-19 Advisory Group page.

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        For current information and resources visit our COVID-19 Advisory Group page