CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Grillo's Pickles

If you haven't been to the Grillo's Pickles website, you should. There, you'll find the fantastic story of how this company began. We've copied part of it here to save you a click.

Grillo's Pickles began with a pickle cart, just a small wooden stand in downtown Boston, where Travis Grillo and his friends would sell two spears for one dollar. Travis would make the pickles by night using his family's 100-year old recipe - one he'd memorized from making pickles every summer as a kid. In the morning, Travis would bike to the Boston Common and set up the cart with his buddies. They'd hang out all day, urging people to try the simple Grillo family pickle. It was a small business but Travis worked hard for it. He made more pickles, biked more miles, and slept less hours than he ever had before.
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CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Factory Five Racing

Factory Five Racing was founded in 1995. Over the years they have grown from a start-up business in a small garage to become the world's largest manufacturer of "build-it-yourself" component car kits. They employ a full-time crew of about 40 people, and are located in Wareham, Massachusetts (about an hour south of Boston). They make their products right here in the USA, in the heart of New England where American manufacturing was born.
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CLIENT SPOTLIGHT: Luca + Danni

Fred and Danny Magnanimi grew up watching their father create beautiful, handcrafted jewelry in the family's Cranston, RI jewelry manufacturing business. When the boys grew up, Fred moved to New York and began working on Wall Street as an investment banker, while younger brother Danny, still enamored by the family business, stayed home. Increased competition from overseas businesses created significant challenges for the business, but Danny was confident he could find a way for the family business to evolve and thrive. This was his mission, this was his passion.
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        Court of Appeals Reinstates Bias Suit Involving Claims of Retaliation

        PS&H employment partner and Chair of the Labor & Employment Group, Alicia Samolis, provided comment to RI Lawyers Weekly on the recent 1st U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Carlson v. University of New England.  The Court’s decision reinstated a case involving claims of a retaliatory transfer of a professor following her complaints of sexual harassment by her supervisor. 
         
        The 1st Circuit panel held the plaintiff could bring the claim despite the fact that she undisputedly requested the transfer.  The Court reasoned that there were “genuine disputes of material fact” over whether or not the university misled her regarding her transfer given that the plaintiff indicated that she would take the transfer if she could continue to her job and teach certain courses. 
         
        In the article published by Lawyers Weekly, Alicia, who was not involved in the case, disagreed with the 1st Circuit panel’s conclusion that a reasonable jury could find the transfer to have been retaliatory. The plaintiff continued to teach her preferred courses after being transferred with the change in course assignments not occurring until more than a year later. 
         
        “There has to be some sort of expiration date on that,” Alicia said. “There had to be a reasonable presumption that things might change. The court doesn’t seem to recognize that here.”
         
        Alicia offered a very simple solution in the article - the employer [university] should have put the terms of the agreed-upon transfer in writing.
         
        “The employee should have been given an offer letter memorializing the details of the transfer, making clear that she was not guaranteed anything,” Alicia said.
         
        Alicia explained that such an offer letter could have reiterated that the plaintiff remained an at-will employee and that teaching assignments could be changed at the university’s discretion – just like any other job.

        Click here to read the full article. (Subscription required)